Buñuelo

A buñuelo (Spanish: [buˈɲwelo]) (alternatively called bimuelo, birmuelo, bermuelo, burmuelo, or bonuelo; Catalan: bunyol, IPA: [buˈɲɔɫ]) is a fried dough ball. It is a popular snack in Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Puerto Rico, Ecuador, Uruguay, Spain, Greece, Guam, Turkey and Morocco, and is a tradition at Christmas, Ramadan, and among Sephardic Jews at Hanukkah. It will usually have a filling or a topping. In Mexican cuisine, it is often served with a syrup made with piloncillo.

Buñuelos are first known to have been consumed among Spain’s Morisco population. They typically consist of a simple, wheat-based yeast dough, often flavored with anise, that is thinly rolled, cut or shaped into individual pieces, then fried and finished off with a sweet topping. Buñuelos may be filled with a variety of things, sweet or savory. They can be round in ball shapes or disc shaped. In Latin America, buñuelos are seen as a symbol of good luck.

There are references to buñuelos in Majorca, Catalonia or Valencia; there are also buñuelos in Turkey, India, Puerto Rico, and Cuba; buñuelos in Russia. Jews in Turkey make buñuelos with matzo meal and eat them during Passover. They are also popular during Hanukkah.[citation needed]

In many Latin American countries, this particular dish can also be made with flour tortillas, and covered in sugar and/or cinnamon.